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question on hare's ear nymph


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#1 tkearins

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Posted 12 March 2009 - 12:34 PM

I just started tying my first hares ear nymphs, and its my first experience with dubbing. that stuff is a pain in the arse. anyway I tied about 4 or 5 size 12 hares ear nymphs with gold ribbing and a goose feather for a wing case (no bead). I was at cabelas, and saw some of their retail ones for comparison, and I have to say mine are MUCH fuzzier and harrier. Theirs look they greased up the dubbing so it doesn't get all fuzzy. is there a right amount of hairiness and a wrong amount of hairiness? should I give my nymphs a haircut?
I stink at fly fishing.

#2 Mainiac

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Posted 12 March 2009 - 01:07 PM

Dubbing is a pain.I just put as little as possible on the thread.Try to avoid clumping.I usually use synthetic dubbing because its easier to work with.
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#3 PFFlyer

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Posted 12 March 2009 - 02:12 PM

tk, I am trying the adams parachute, talk about a pain, I'll tie 2 salt for every one of these little pissers, my dubbing is also too fluffy were it needs to be more shaped and smooth, try less and get just to the thread and that is what I have, thread, what the heck ever, these are going in the water, maybe tied to a coors light can

#4 tkearins

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Posted 12 March 2009 - 03:25 PM

PF.......does your wife work for an eye place? I just looked at your profile and recognized the name...., I wonder if you're the same Pete thats married to my office manager... and if you are, then we've met before.
I stink at fly fishing.

#5 searsportshuffle

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Posted 12 March 2009 - 03:43 PM

The old advice on dubbing...take what you think you will need and put half of it back. Also when tying synthetic material I wet my fingers a bit to get it to go on the thead nice and tight. If you want it buggier just dont wind it as tight, or scruff it up with a emery board or something.

#6 Dave M

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Posted 12 March 2009 - 03:59 PM

Getting dubbing right takes a little practice. Keep at it.

That "put half back" advice is right on...but if you don't want to do it that way try Gary LaFontaine's "touch dubbing" technique.

Chop up your hares ear dubbing really fine.....and put it into a small ball. Now wax (or better yet...glue)up and down your thread...and just touch the dubbing ball to the thread. Almost impossible to over-dub that way. If you feel your bodies are then too sparse.....just touch dub a second time. Slick-as-snot.
Perhaps I'm a masochist......but I really enjoy dubbing. Sick ohmy.gif ...I know. [:I]

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#7 Pat Z.

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Posted 12 March 2009 - 04:13 PM

(Converted Post)
Originally posted by Dave M

Gbut I really enjoy dubbing.


that's the thing. When you finally figure it out and get the right body (whether it be tapered and smooth, or buggy), it's actually enough of an accomplishment that you can sit back and enjoy tying a good looking fly.

Or you can just twist antron and tie a few dozen serendipitys.

#8 ctw

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Posted 12 March 2009 - 04:29 PM

Another technique is the 'Split-Thread'. Great for small flies, ultra-slim and/or sparsely dubbed bodies. It can be used on larger patterns, too. It takes practice but is a good skill to have...

Wind your thread onto the hook shank. Untwist the thread by spinning the bobbin (look closely and you can see in which direction the thread was originally wound). Run the edge of a needle back and forth on the thread to flatten and expose the thread fibers. Insert your needle between the thread fibers to create a split in the thread. Place your dubbing into the split and rewind the thread. Basically, it's a single strand dubbing loop and it really locks the dubbing down.

#9 Water Rat

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Posted 12 March 2009 - 08:50 PM

I just started tying this year as well, and have done up a bunch of hare's ears. The trick it not to add too much, and always twist in the same direction. Helps to have someone show you how to do it. I've had no problem getting the natural hare's mask dubbing to work, and I don't even wax the thread or anything. I went through the beginner's class down at Eldridge's, it was great.

As to your other question, you actually want the thorax to be very hairy, you want to use a dubbing tool to pull out the hairs to make it more buggy looking. Try several strands of black crystal flash for the wing case instead of the goose feather, it looks good and adds some flash.
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#10 Russ

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Posted 13 March 2009 - 06:06 AM

I don't like to dub either, but it's all part of the total tying experience. It's a link to the past.
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#11 Mainiac

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Posted 13 March 2009 - 06:26 AM

I love to dub,but dubbing flies sucks!biggrin.gif
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#12 PFFlyer

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Posted 13 March 2009 - 08:17 AM

tk, nope my wife is right under my thumb here in the store. I appreciate the tech. advice on the flys guys, time in the barrel and I will get er done but for now what a pain in the aff. Tying right is my goal, fish on is going to be a painful spring. Unless we just fish Kevin's bass farm!!.

#13 Dave M

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Posted 13 March 2009 - 08:22 AM

(Converted Post)
Originally posted by ctw

Another technique is the 'Split-Thread'. Great for small flies, ultra-slim and/or sparsely dubbed bodies. It can be used on larger patterns, too. It takes practice but is a good skill to have...


Correct.......unless you use Uni thread. Uni is a bonded thread.....so the split-thread technique is next to impossible to accomplish. Danville is fine for that purpose, FWIW.

Dave M
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#14 ctw

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Posted 13 March 2009 - 09:03 AM

Dave,

6/0 Uni is my standard. You're right that Uni is "bonded", but unwinding the thread (spinning the bobbin, that is) then rubbing the needle against the un-wound thread will open Uni right up.

I find that a split-thread makes dubbing more than one color in progression a bit easier, too. Just mine...

#15 tkearins

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Posted 13 March 2009 - 11:35 AM

wow thanks for the advice. I might try the split thread next time, right now I'm using 8/0 brown, I dunno if its uni thread or not, but I'll find out next time I go down to the basement to tie. and I guess my hares ear nymphs aren't OVER-hairy after I googled a few of some other peoples and compared. I just wonder how the dubbing is going to hold up once I toss it in the water a few times, hoping it won't just unravel or disintegrate.
I stink at fly fishing.

#16 Water Rat

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Posted 13 March 2009 - 02:26 PM

A hare's ear is considered to be a fly that you can't tie too ugly. Kind of like tying a woolly bugger too fluffy. I've seen some hare's ears that looked like something the cat coughed up, and they work just fine.
Dave

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#17 PFFlyer

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Posted 13 March 2009 - 04:51 PM

thanks for that water rat, makes it easier to go forward

#18 lachance8443

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Posted 13 March 2009 - 09:55 PM

when i started tying H.E.'s I could never get a profile i really liked. I started using the hareline blends for the abdomen and that kept the spikiness down. For the thorax i just mixed the hareline with dubbing strait from the mask, and it turned out nice. You get the buggyness of the mask hair, but the workability of the pre blended. Try it out if you get a chance.




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