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brown owl step by step


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#1 Tom

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Posted 14 November 2009 - 03:26 PM

same deal as the kennebago muddler, tying some for the shop and figured I might as well do a tutorial on it as well.

Tie in oval tinsel. Wrap body forward being watchful for gaps between wraps. Leave a little extra room there for your throat wing and collar

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Tie in natural brn bucktail throat. I find that the diameter of the oval tinsel has a tendancy to flare the hair here so I make my final wraps just back over the body. This will get covered up later by wing and collar

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Tie in a single teal flank feather flat over the hookshank. It needs to be narrow and run straight. Nice, even tips and bold banding help. You want the feather to cup or shroud the sides of the fly.

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note how I take the stem and fold it back over and tie it down some more. This really helps prevent the wing from pulling out. You can add a dollup of cement here if you'd like, but it isn't necessary if you are using enough thread tension

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wrap grizzly collar hackle. I really like using the webbiest stuff I can get
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the original pattern called for the top of the hackle to be trimmed off. As it was intended to imitate a golden stonefly, this was probably due to wanting the hackle to emulate legs and not be to thick and also to give the fly a narrower profile

finished:
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#2 jefff

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Posted 14 November 2009 - 06:00 PM

Hey Tom you tied it backwards...will never work like that.

#3 Owls Roost

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Posted 15 November 2009 - 07:28 AM

Just to give you an idea as to what the real deal looks like in comparison to the Judas bug:



#4 flytire

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Posted 15 November 2009 - 08:25 AM

i like that

heres the improved brown owl. might make tying is easier for beginners



#5 TGIF

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Posted 18 November 2009 - 03:12 PM

So it is designed to imitate an adult stonefly, but you fish it like a streamer?

Is that accurate?

#6 Kevin McKay

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Posted 18 November 2009 - 04:55 PM

good stuff Tom,thanks
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#7 Tom

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Posted 18 November 2009 - 05:05 PM

I believe it was originally intentioned to be a stonefly imitation but everyone I know that fishes them loves them and fish them as streamers, though it is an effective fall pattern worked across the surface

#8 wj35

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Posted 18 November 2009 - 07:51 PM

Pretty cool fly, I might have to try that pattern on the Deschutes next spring.

#9 Owls Roost

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Posted 19 November 2009 - 08:18 AM

The Brown Owl was originated by Bob Broad the owner of the Brown Owl Tackle Shop in Errol, NH. It was meant to be fished in the surface film, imitating a struggling adult stonefly which hatches in late June and early July in the Errol area. This hatch occurs right at dark and beyond and is also seen on the Connecticut in Pittsburg. These stones are huge and a size #4 is not too big to tie the Brown Owl on.

Not to be contrary, but I was taught to tie the bucktail in sparse as a collar and use the brown side of a yellow dyed buck tail. Extend the tips slightly beyond the bend of the hook.

#10 Tom

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Posted 19 November 2009 - 05:03 PM

I will have to re-check, but I believe I am tying the pattern as I know it from one of Dick Stewart's books. I knew the pattern came from the upper Andro area, thanks for the clarification.




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