Jump to content


Photo

Adams Wet Fly


  • Please log in to reply
8 replies to this topic

#1 Pocono

Pocono

    Crayfish

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 76 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Bailey Island, ME
  • Interests:Fly fishing, traveling, sailing, skiing, hiking, tennis, motorcycling

Posted 08 June 2011 - 07:20 PM

A couple of people replied to the Partridge & Orange post saying that they like wet flies and fish them a lot.

I do the same thing.

Where I came from in the Poconos, my home stream was Broadhead Creek, which is home to some pretty good wet fly history. Jim Leisenring fished it frequently in and around the 50's, along with people like Pete Hiddy and others. I've spent some time reading Jim's book: The Art of Tying the Wet Fly , 1971, and studying his patterns. I like several of them and they all work for me on the Broadhead and other streams; probably as well as they did back when he was fishing them. Pete Hiddy calls these wingless wet flies "Flymphs", which is how I've come to refer to them.

One of the things that I really like about fishing these wets is that you never have any doubt when you have a fish on, because the take is usually explosive and the hooking is done 90+% of the time by the fish itself!

Here's one of my favorites; a Flymph version of the popular Adams pattern:



1. Here are the materials that I used: 1. Mustad 3399A, #8 hook, 2. Danville Flymaster 6/0, Adams gray, 3. Grizzly and brown hen hackles, 4. Muskrat dubbing (natural gray color).

Posted Image

2. Thread the hook; stopping in the middle between the hook point and the barb. [Note: I build a “shoulder” on my wets; I don’t thread the very front of the hook until I’m ready to add hackle or feather slip wings. It helps to organize the body and to cut down on the size of the head when the fly is finished.]

Posted Image

3. Tie in the tail, which as in most Adams patterns is a combination of grizzly and brown hen hackle barbs. [Note: place the grizzly and brown hen hackles on top of each other, then tear off both fibers at the same time. You can adjust the size of one vs. the other by doing this, rather than trying to match them up by hand after you’ve pulled off the barbs.] I tie this pattern with longer grizzly barbs and smaller brown barbs, but that’s just personal preference.

Posted Image

4. Use your tying thread to build up a pseudo-cigar shaped body. This is also personal preference on my part; others use a straight body.

Posted Image

5. Advance your thread to the front and tie in a separate short piece of tying thread. This will become the rib of the fly. Continue to use butt wraps of tying thread all the way back to the tail tie-in point.

Posted Image

6. Dub the body with the natural muskrat. Keep the dubbing relatively thin; particularly if you’ve already built up a thread body in step #4. I use the direct dubbing technique.

Posted Image

7. Counter wind the thread rib back to the shoulder of the fly, which will give you some semblance of a segmented body.

Posted Image

8. Prepare and mount the collar hackles. To do this, select two hen hackles that are roughly the same size; one grizzly and the other brown; just like for the tail. I prep the feathers by pulling the barbs down from the tip, cutting the tip flat and then cutting the flat tip in the shape of a diamond. This forms the anchor that you need to get a good tight tie-in for the hackles. Here are the prepped hackles; grizzly on the left and brown on the right:

Posted Image

9. Put one hackle on top of the other. I put the grizzly on top of the brown because I want the grizzly hackle to be the one that’s closest to the eye when they’re tied in, wrapped and tied off. Then, tie in both hackles by their anchors; at the same time and in the same place; right at the forward end of the shoulder. You want the shiny sides of the hackle to be facing you when you tie them in. I tied them in on the top of the hook, but you can mount them anywhere you want. Note the tips of the anchors sticking out past the thread to the right. These are trimmed off close before I start winding on the hackle.

Posted Image

10. Put your hackle pliers on both of the hackle stems and take two full winds of hackle around the hook. Be sure to pull the hackle fibers back towards the end of the hook as you wind on the hackle. This will help you to avoid “renegade” hackle barbs. After taking the turns of hackle, tie them off with 3-4 flattened wraps.

Posted Image

11. Cut off the waste ends for both the grizzly and brown hackles, clean up the front of the fly and form the head with tying thread.

Posted Image

12. Finish the fly off with either 2-3 half hitches or a whip finish. You can add a drop if head cement if you want; I did, I use SHHAN.

Here’s the finished fly:

Posted Image

And here’s another shot of it from the front quarter:

Posted Image


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Don Bastian, the well-known wet fly tyer, ties this pattern as a winged wet, or as I would say: as a winged Flymph. Here’s the fly tied with a grizzly hackle wing and a wet fly type of head:

1. Set up the body as you did with the Flymph, but keep it relatively thin and straight.

Posted Image

2. Select two grizzly hackles and prepare the tips so that they are sized to the hook. You want the wings to extend just about to the bend in the hook. Strip the rest of the barbs from both hackles, pair them back-to-back and tie them in on the top of the hook, at the shoulder.

Posted Image

3. Wind on the brown and grizzly hackles. Don does it one hackle at a time; so that’s the way that I did it after I prepped them as in step #8 above. Tie in and wind on the brown hackle first, followed by the grizzly. One wrap of each hackle is all that he calls for. At this point I switched to black thread to form the head, which is traditional for most winged wet flies. Here’s the finished fly:

Posted Image



Pocono

#2 BRK TRT

BRK TRT

    Atlantic Salmon

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1505 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Along A Small Stream

Posted 08 June 2011 - 07:41 PM

It's a killer fly.

I tie it as a winged fly, using mallard flank feathers.


Brk Trt

#3 mac

mac

    Atlantic Salmon

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4325 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Wesrtern Maine Mountains
  • Interests:All things outdoors, especially fishing with my grandson.

Posted 09 June 2011 - 10:53 AM

Awesome looking patterns, thanks for sharing. I see some more tying in my near future. ;) :lol:
Mac
Square Tail

#4 Pocono

Pocono

    Crayfish

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 76 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Bailey Island, ME
  • Interests:Fly fishing, traveling, sailing, skiing, hiking, tennis, motorcycling

Posted 10 June 2011 - 05:33 AM

It's a killer fly.

I tie it as a winged fly, using mallard flank feathers.


Brk Trt


Brk Trt,

That sounds like a nice variation with the mallard flank wing. Do you have a pic of it?

Pocono

#5 Walter

Walter

    Atlantic Salmon

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1389 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:USA
  • Interests:Brook Trout, Salmon, Fly Fishing, Fly Tying, Hunting, Being outside, family

Posted 10 June 2011 - 08:29 AM

Wonderful S.B.S.
Give a man a fish, he eats for a day....teach a man to fish and he will sit in a boat and drink beer all day.

#6 AK Skim

AK Skim

    Atlantic Salmon

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1718 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:New Jersey - Live there, not from here.

Posted 11 June 2011 - 10:06 AM

WOW...

Very nice wet flies.

Thanks.
Life Member - Trout Unlimited

#7 mac

mac

    Atlantic Salmon

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4325 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Wesrtern Maine Mountains
  • Interests:All things outdoors, especially fishing with my grandson.

Posted 20 June 2011 - 10:48 AM

Thanks for the post Pocono. I tied up a few Saturday and tried them out yesterday morning and they were awesome (1 SMB, 2 nice fat browns to hand and 2 more lost in 30 minutes). I think I'll tie a few different color combos of the same pattern. ;) B)
Mac
Square Tail

#8 Pocono

Pocono

    Crayfish

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 76 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Bailey Island, ME
  • Interests:Fly fishing, traveling, sailing, skiing, hiking, tennis, motorcycling

Posted 20 June 2011 - 09:18 PM

Thanks for the post Pocono. I tied up a few Saturday and tried them out yesterday morning and they were awesome (1 SMB, 2 nice fat browns to hand and 2 more lost in 30 minutes). I think I'll tie a few different color combos of the same pattern. ;) B)



Mac,

Glad you had good results with the Adams wet pattern.

I'm sure you've got some good ideas of your own, but here are some that you may want to consider.

Being from the Poconos, I'm a great fan of the Jim Leisenring patterns; almost all wingless wets. Here are three that have worked very well for me with trout:

1. Brown Hackle: hook size - #12-14, thread - crimson or claret, tail - none, body - bronze colored peacock herl (leave your regular green peacock herl in the sun for a couple of days and you'll have bronze herl), rib - narrow gold tinsel, hackle - furnace.

2. Old Blue Dun: hook size - #12-14, thread: primrose yellow (Pearsall's gossamer tying silk is the best for this pattern), tail - a few blue dun rooster barbs, body - dubbed muskrat (dubbed light so that some of the yellow tying thread shows through), rib, yellow buttonhole twist (or doubled and twisted primrose yellow tying thread), hackle - blue dun.

3. Black Gnat: hook size - #14-16, thread - crimson or claret, body - black silk or black tying thread, hackle - starling shoulder (irredescent).

Fished across and down, on the swing with intermittent rod stops along the drift and a pronounced stop at the end of the drift; or a "Leisenring Lift" as we called it in the Poconos, these patterns are almost all good for several fish on any given day.

Good luck! If you decide to tie up any of the above, let me know how they work for you.

Pocono

#9 mac

mac

    Atlantic Salmon

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4325 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Wesrtern Maine Mountains
  • Interests:All things outdoors, especially fishing with my grandson.

Posted 21 June 2011 - 04:51 AM

Mac,

Glad you had good results with the Adams wet pattern.

I'm sure you've got some good ideas of your own, but here are some that you may want to consider.

Being from the Poconos, I'm a great fan of the Jim Leisenring patterns; almost all wingless wets. Here are three that have worked very well for me with trout:

1. Brown Hackle: hook size - #12-14, thread - crimson or claret, tail - none, body - bronze colored peacock herl (leave your regular green peacock herl in the sun for a couple of days and you'll have bronze herl), rib - narrow gold tinsel, hackle - furnace.

2. Old Blue Dun: hook size - #12-14, thread: primrose yellow (Pearsall's gossamer tying silk is the best for this pattern), tail - a few blue dun rooster barbs, body - dubbed muskrat (dubbed light so that some of the yellow tying thread shows through), rib, yellow buttonhole twist (or doubled and twisted primrose yellow tying thread), hackle - blue dun.

3. Black Gnat: hook size - #14-16, thread - crimson or claret, body - black silk or black tying thread, hackle - starling shoulder (irredescent).

Fished across and down, on the swing with intermittent rod stops along the drift and a pronounced stop at the end of the drift; or a "Leisenring Lift" as we called it in the Poconos, these patterns are almost all good for several fish on any given day.

Good luck! If you decide to tie up any of the above, let me know how they work for you.

Pocono

Thanks again Pocono, they sound like productive patterns also. I do have a couple of ideas for variations on the Adams wet. After I test my theories I'll let you know how they work out and pass on the patterns if they work out well. ;) :D
Mac
Square Tail




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

Kevin McKay, Owner
About Kevin McKay and Maine Fly Fish
My name is Kevin McKay and I became a Master Maine Guide in 2003. But before that I started www.maineflyfish.com, one of the largest fly fishing web sites on the east coast. It is dedicated to helping everyone who is new and experienced, to bring out their best when it comes to fly fishing. So it was only natural I became a guide and I haven't looked back.
Designed and Managed by
Join us on Facebook • Follow us on Twitter • Videos on YouTube
Contact Us • Visit our sister site @ Maine Fishing Adventures
© 2014 Maineflyfish.com