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Name This Pattern #4


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#1 AK Skim

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Posted 22 November 2011 - 02:14 PM

Name this pattern #4

Posted Image

Thanks for looking and good luck!
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#2 Walter

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Posted 22 November 2011 - 04:35 PM

looks like it could be a variation of the telephone box...but I don't think thats right.

#3 SmellTheGlove

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Posted 22 November 2011 - 10:49 PM

"Wood Duck Cluster F__k"

:D

#4 Dave M

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Posted 23 November 2011 - 08:08 AM

"Wood Duck Cluster F__k"

:D



Now THAT'S funny...that was exactly what I was thinking. HaHa...

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#5 notquiteflyfishing

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Posted 23 November 2011 - 09:09 AM

looks like a variation of a royal coachman wet fly
I swear the fish was THIS BIG!

#6 TGIF

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Posted 23 November 2011 - 04:24 PM

Actually, in seriousness, it looks like a variation of a Bronze or Olive Heron, originated by the Late Great Nick Lambrou of Manchester, NH.

The colors are hard to decern from the picture, but that is my guess. The variation is caused by the addition of the tail, but a little orange is always likely to entice a brookie or two.

Nick Lambrou is also the designer of the Bronze Mallard and Wooduck Heron fly. It is these two flys, and watching Nick tie them in his kitchen, that caused me to start tying flies. Quickly i realized that these simple little streamers/wets were not so simple to tie, and I burned through about 3 woodduck butts trying to figure it out. I've not got it down pat.

If these flys came from a Maine Fly Box, i'd definately put my money on the olive or bronze heron.

#7 TGIF

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Posted 23 November 2011 - 04:26 PM

P.S. when tied correctly, with more of a "wood special" kind of wing, a #12 Bronze Heron is killer during an alderfly hatch when they are pikcing off emergers.

#8 AK Skim

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Posted 23 November 2011 - 05:13 PM

Actually, in seriousness, it looks like a variation of a Bronze or Olive Heron, originated by the Late Great Nick Lambrou of Manchester, NH.

The colors are hard to decern from the picture, but that is my guess. The variation is caused by the addition of the tail, but a little orange is always likely to entice a brookie or two.

Nick Lambrou is also the designer of the Bronze Mallard and Wooduck Heron fly. It is these two flys, and watching Nick tie them in his kitchen, that caused me to start tying flies. Quickly i realized that these simple little streamers/wets were not so simple to tie, and I burned through about 3 woodduck butts trying to figure it out. I've not got it down pat.

If these flys came from a Maine Fly Box, i'd definately put my money on the olive or bronze heron.

P.S. when tied correctly, with more of a "wood special" kind of wing, a #12 Bronze Heron is killer during an alderfly hatch when they are pikcing off emergers.



WOW. ... !!!

Every now and then someone comes along with a post explaining the history of a tier or pattern like this.

I wanted to flip the page and continue reading....

TGIF ... thank you very much for taking the time to post your response.

BRAVO ZULU
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#9 TGIF

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Posted 23 November 2011 - 07:46 PM

I am glad that post hit the spot. Here is a pic of the heron flies, olive and bronze as I mentioned. http://www.stonerive...-fly/4,663.html Seems close enough to me, if you factor in tying styles and the addition of the tail.

Stone river happens to be my local sh here in NH, and they carry quite a few of the old NH patterns. Here is the wood duck heron also invented by Nick. http://www.stonerive...-wet/4,671.html

It it too bad that they don't have a Pic of the bronze mallard, A's that is my favorite. It resembles the wood duck heron, but the body is built from a palmered bronze mallard feather, hackled with a red shoulder feather from a golden pheasant which is then hackled with white hen saddle. All of the flies from nick are all around producers, but the mallard and wood duck heron are the best. Both were designed to imitate the "pin" smelt of lake winni.

Nick is known A's the only NH man to be named angler of the year by rod and reel magazine. That is all I know, but I can say that if it wasn't for those visits to his kitchen in Manchester I would have never sat down behind a vice.


Nick was somewhat of a legend in NH, and specialized in tribe fishing in the lakes region, catching the elusive sea run trout of NH, and was always willing to point me in a direction as a newbie.

#10 MarchBrown

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Posted 28 November 2011 - 02:30 PM

Although a good guess, it's not Lambrou's Heron fly, it's a streamer called the Moby Dick. Pretty popular on the Deerfield River in MA and in CT as well.

http://globalflyfish...ng/mobydick.htm

#11 Twenty-twenty

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Posted 28 November 2011 - 03:42 PM

A good looking fly. Looks like it would work for an emerging alder as well. Took me a while to figure out how to tie the wood duck heron, but I've got it down now and tie plenty every year. I like the traditional herron flies as well because they are so easy to tie and also affective. I've done well with a small olive for a green caddis emerger.

#12 jimbob

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Posted 04 December 2011 - 09:10 PM

I have used similar type patterns of my own design to mimic crayfish.. It works pretyy well at times in deep water. Tied in a 4- 6x..Also, make the material xtra large!! Its important for the olive mallard to be tied flat over the top like a woods special..Originally got the idea from the Doc Spratley..Its a fly I used a lot in Kamloops back in the day..




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