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#1 gunner

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Posted 02 December 2011 - 08:09 PM

A while ago we were discussing kayaks for fishing. I couldn't find that thread but, during my research for a new kayak for Florida, I came across these. There is one dealer in Maine.

http://www.nucanoe.com/

Joe

#2 PFFlyer

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Posted 03 December 2011 - 06:23 AM

those look cool joe.

#3 cap

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Posted 03 December 2011 - 06:48 AM

Looks pretty nice...I'd like to demo one...but they seem to be pretty heavy for their size....they do have some beam and stability and that must account for some of that added weight.....but they must get even heavier if you decide to customize it like some of the photos at the website with the fish finders, rod holders, swivel seats, anchor systems, tackle boxes, coolers, milk crates, etc.....or if you look at some of the rigs at kayak fishing sites....

I have been fishing from a kayak with my friend for years now and his is all tricked out. Once it is in the water it is pretty nice but he has so much stuff added and it is so heavy that he really can't use it by himself...He pretty much has to go with someone else to help him get it on and off the top of the truck's rook racks, plus it has to ride with the topside up while it's up there. He brings multiple rods and all kinds of stuff. Once he is on the water he has a lot of the amenities of fishing from a larger boat and he can get into shallow water and it still is less of a hassle than a bigger boat, but not all that much. He wpuld need a trailer to fish with it and launch it by himself...a trailer for a kayak?

There are two schools of thought on this...and I do it the other way....

I have a very light SOT with nothing added except a short peice of line with a window sash weight for an anchor...and I bring a small cooler for brewskis and to hold a raincoat in a plastic bag. I minimize the tackle to what fits in my fishing vest if I'm taking a lot of tackle or what fits in a fishing shirt if I'm taking less, I take one rod (sometimes a back up but not usually...I'm usually fishing while he is just trying to launch his "Titanic" and getting it all rigged up and ready.... I don't have to worry about losing stuff in a capsize...In fact i love how simple the SOT is to fish from....I usually sit on mine sideways when I fish and paddle my feet as if I was sitting on the edge of a dock.....kayak fishing is uncomfortable if you have your legs stretched out in front of you for long periods of time....just offering you some advice if you are new to the kayak fishing scene... If you go to kayak fishing internet sites most of them show you how to add stuff to the boat....a canoe is probably a better platform for using more stuff...IMHO the kayak KISS system is the way to go...

YMMV..... I'd like still like to try one because it sorta bridges the gap between kayaks and canoes...but I think it might be like combi skis which are suppose to work as classic or skate skis...but don't do either all that well...or a motor sailer boat which is not a great power boat or a great sail boat...but still I am curious...
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#4 spector82

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Posted 03 December 2011 - 11:07 AM

I have been researching a new kayak options this fall, definitely looking into the standups as I dislike casting/stripping line from inside a low to the water kayak.
I have been looking at Native watercraft standups as well for the coming season, I saw Jeremy from Fliesandfins.com using one a few years back and they seem like pretty stable casting platforms, I don't intend to be landlocked another spring without some type of boat,...fairly large investment for these however to get them all rigged up with anchor systems, paddles, rod holders etc. and basic boat in the $700-1200 range. Sit on tops look interesting as well, however I would be a bit concerned with water coming over the sides in chop, I see these are used for deep sea gamefishing as they are self bailing on various sites.

http://www.nativewatercraft.com/

#5 Water Rat

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Posted 03 December 2011 - 08:37 PM

Looks like a decent boat. It is an open cockpit though, the thing to keep in mind is that an open cockpit is not always a dry ride. Splash from paddling will get you wet in an open kayak, it isn't the same as paddling a canoe. I own two kayaks, one with an open cockpit and one without. I use them for different purposes, like them both. The open cockpit is an Ocean Kayak Predator, the other one is an Old Town Dirigo Angler. Tom has an Old Town Dirigo on sale in the classified forum if you are interested, for about half the price of a new one.
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#6 Flychef

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Posted 03 December 2011 - 11:48 PM

Get a freedom hawk. There are a few different size options to choose from. I fished it all summer long and loved it. The yak fits in the back of my truck, is extremely stable, has a mount for a motor and I can load and unload it easily by myself. It really is the ultimate fly fishing platform. Just my 2 cents.

#7 cap

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Posted 04 December 2011 - 07:43 AM

Joe,

I suppose if you are looking for a Florida boat it is more gonna be used in backcountry, mangrove and flat...being able to stand up is what is driving your decision...right? Sight fishing?



What I finding intriguing about this boat is you can do that but also at least for Maine use, I'd be very interested in the smaller lighter boat with the rowing option...I think it could be a pretty neat mini solo driftboat......

The smaller boat is light enough to launch in places where you can drag it to the river, through the trees, without having a boat launch available (I drag my sit on top and sometimes my canoes through the trees and down the embankments on some rivers)...With the rowing option you'd be able to row and maneuver around rocks and rapids plus you have the option to stand up to fly fish....

My initial idea of this boat being in between a kayak and canoe and there for unworthy as either has been tempered as I think about it...now i think it may be ideal for my style of fishing...

First off my sit on top is light and i can get in and out easily but it does'nt have the oar option...and 2 I can't stand up on it...it is slow....

My canoe is heavier, I can stand up in it, and it does have oars...but it isn't as easy to get in and out of as the SOT and it can swamp in bigger water....so maybe a NUcanoe is the way to go?

I suppose I could get that small one down through some pretty heavy whitewater with the oars...I'd get wet...but that is par for the course with most small sit on top styles and even canoes.....I think it would be the bomb for fishing stretches of The Dead or the West Branch that are pretty much unfished now.....and as far as speed...say you want to bomb through a flatwater section? You turn that thing around and row it and you can move way faster with oars than any double kayak paddle....

I use an Old Town Osprey canoe as a mini solo driftboat now...I have it rigged with oars...but I think this would be maybe even better and simpler....the canoe can still capsize and/or fill with water...but a Sit on top with scuppers all the water would drain out...you'd punch through alot of the whitewater...but you'd stay upright....

Just my observations ....I'd like to try one out.....I think it also replace anything you want to do in a pontoon or even a float tube...One boat that replaces several....I like that.....
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#8 cap

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Posted 04 December 2011 - 07:49 AM

It isn't self bailing is it? I saw that the one customer drilled holes through it so it would be, for use with her dogs....I think it needs self bailers installed and then it would be the bomb....
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#9 flytire

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Posted 04 December 2011 - 11:47 AM

wish i had a raptor



#10 Russ

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Posted 04 December 2011 - 04:01 PM

I have fished out of kayaks and canoes. I prefer a canoe by far. I also have outriggers on both my kayak and canoe, which eliminates capsizing. Very stable!!! I like to be able to move around in a canoe which you can't do in a kayak. Plus it is much easier to stand up in a canoe. My outriggers don't weigh much at all and are well worth the cost.
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#11 gunner

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Posted 05 December 2011 - 08:57 PM

At this point, it looks like a choice between a Native Ultimate equipped with pontoons from stand-n-fish.com or the nucanoe. Will be trying each out in Tampa Bay shortly.
I have 2 SINK's in Maine, my regular is an Old Town Loon 138. For the ocean and bay I want a SOT.

#12 gseries69

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Posted 09 December 2011 - 09:29 AM

I'm sure everyone already knows this, but every option will have it's pros and cons. I have fished from the Native Kayak and standing up is one thing, but fishing while standing is an entirely different ballgame. They are not as stable as you think wihout pontoons. The freedom kayak is the best option for a self contained (meaning no extra pontoons) stand up kayak but it is no fun to paddle any distance. That is where the nucanoe may excel. I have never tried one but it's lines look like it paddles well and can be fished from standing up. Standing up in general is something you may want to consider. If you are in the everglades there is limited sight fishing due to the tanic waters and it may be a long distnace between areas worthy of sight casting. I have also tried poling while flyfishing. It was not easy. I use a hobie pedal kayak and really like it but you can't stand up in it. It's advantage is that using your legs you can go much farther with less fatigue. You can also have your hands ready to cast versus putting down a paddle and grabbing your flyrod. The hardest part of using a paddle kayak is keeping quiet when trying to put down the paddle or poll and grab your flyrod, plus the extra time it takes when you are trying to cast to a moving fish. The down side of the hobie in addition to not standing is that the fins that propel the kayak require about a foot or so of water underneath you. It can still be paddled with the rudder down and has a pontoon option and lots of great accessories. They are on the heavy side at around 70 pounds but they also have a great wheel set up that breaks down and fits in the front compartment so I would not worry about that. The other consideration I would look at is a Ghenoe (sp?). They are widely used in the back country. They are simple, stable, can be paddled, rowed, or have an electirc or gas motor put on it. You can also trick them out. Check out microskiff.com and you'll see some cool setups. They would also be incredible for fishing marshes in the spring for stripers and great for lakes and ponds.

#13 Russ

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Posted 11 December 2011 - 07:54 PM

I think I will do more canoeing this coming summer.
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#14 jcoops

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Posted 12 December 2011 - 06:35 AM

I have a peenoe (similar to a gheenoe) and it really isn't a paddling boat. There may be one model that is reasonable to paddle or row, but most are best for towing and small outboards. They will work for poling, however and are nice fishing platforms.

#15 ProfMoxie

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Posted 12 December 2011 - 10:37 AM

I've got an Old Town Casco 138. It's heavy, but pretty stable (I take it out on the ocean and it works just fine). Incidentally, I've been casually shopping it around for awhile simply because I can't afford another one and my wife and I would like to go out together sometimes, so I'd like to sell it and get two smaller ones so we can kayak together. So if anyone is interested, let me know.
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