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Maine Fly Fish

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  1. Past hour
  2. R-Factor

    Well....

    Conversations about the first trip to Cape Cod have already begun in the office this past week. With that said, this past fall was a lot of fun...first nice buck taken in years...tenderloin tonight was off the charts.
  3. Yesterday
  4. brosa1450

    Well....

    That’s why I posted in the salt section fellas I meant “off” as in stripers. Of course I’m still fishing!
  5. LaBonte207

    Well....

    I’m with plecain. I mean it’s no stripers on the flats, in shorts and a t-shirt..... man I miss summer.
  6. plecain

    Well....

    Off? Whats off?
  7. TGIF

    Squid

    Ha! I thought you were being dramatic until I watched the video. I lost interest when they used half of a whiting 100 pack for hackle.
  8. pa muddler

    Let's talk wet flies?

    The last few years, for Maine fish, it is easy! partridge and anything, floating line and a long cast usually. The tail of pools, as they slow has been working. If that does not work a small (14) muddler wanabe very sparse.
  9. brosa1450

    Well....

    ....how’s everyone surviving the off season?
  10. Bigspencer

    Do you fish Klinkhammers?

    Ditto.....am finally going to learn how to tie ....The Klink certainly brings success...and the process is much simpler and easier than the oldschool style, but fwiw I have usually bought the plain ol' unweighted nymph and have used some type of needle/pin or tweezers to primp up body hair and saturate with paste floatant....drifting the imitation during days/eves of the spring hatches can be a little more fun & interesting than simply drifting the dry dun imitation..
  11. Kevin McKay

    Ordering new decals

  12. Last week
  13. ossipee

    Ordering new decals

    I kinda like the first one, feels fishier.
  14. TightLinesMaine

    Been thinking, which isnt always good

    Saco does get a small salmon return. I've caught smolts (unintentionally, while fishing for browns) surprisingly far up river, and grilse/MSW have been trapped in the lower river just about every year (check out the maine DMR trap counts). Water temps definitely aren't optimal there but salmon can survive water temps into the low 70*s
  15. A_fish_ienado

    Been thinking, which isnt always good

    Interesting. I agree about the warm waters but am wondering if it compares to the temperatures of the Great Lakes fisheries? I know the salmon river gets deathly hot in the summer months but still has quite an outstanding run of steelhead (rainbows, lakebows, lakerun trout whatever you want to call them). Couldn't steelhead just retreat to the ocean for cooler temps and run the rivers when they cool down October-April? On another note about the Saco, I spent a good deal of time exploring sections this spring and stumbled upon a population of holdover rainbow trout. Rainbows were not stocked here but I do believe they were stocked fish that swam down stream, (past a couple dams) and had found water that suites their needs. These fish were a little dark in color, similar to the fish I see coming from the andro, but fat, fiesty and cooperative towards a fly. I landed several mid-high teens fish out of the same body of water and witnessed a young boy throwing a worm and bobber land a 22"-24" bright fat hen that looked to be full of eggs. Fish were displaying spawning behavior at times. I think the bows would do well but with the hope of Atlantic Salmon and the fact these fish were caught around prime Atlantic salmon spawning grounds, I would assume it would be hard to justify any major stocking program in the Saco.
  16. TGIF

    Been thinking, which isnt always good

    Our coast rivers get very warm, so I think there was more effort on searun browns which are more resilient to heat, which occasionally are caught here an there... but haven't any talk of steelhead in Maine... there are myths about an experiment in NH, but those are tales of many decades ago.
  17. A_fish_ienado

    Been thinking, which isnt always good

    Has Maine ever tried steelhead in our coastal waters? I realize with the thread of hope that is Atlantic Salmon restoration this would probably be very controversial but am just curious if it has ever been attempted.
  18. plecain

    Been thinking, which isnt always good

    It gains some colder water in Conway/Bartlett NH where the Dry, Sawyer, Ellis, Rocky Branch, East Branch and Swift River merge with it. After that it's very much a lowland river.
  19. TGIF

    Been thinking, which isnt always good

    Where does the Saco gain cold water. It is like a bathtub in Fryeburge in June.
  20. papa

    Been thinking, which isnt always good

    Going out on a limb here but I'd like to see them in the Saco. The salmon club has been stocking salmon for a lot of years without much results except for overseas commercial fishing. The waters are warmer than the were years ago and in my personal opinion (and I could be totally off here) not optimal for salmon
  21. Butch Moore

    Ordering new decals

    I'm kind partial to the original...
  22. TightLinesMaine

    Ordering new decals

    Second would be less expensive to print/make too y/n?
  23. TightLinesMaine

    Been thinking, which isnt always good

    Bingo, that lake i believe you're referring to is one of the largest lakes in maine too by water volume (as opposed to surface area).
  24. TGIF

    Been thinking, which isnt always good

    There are more fingerling rainbows around than people give credit for... but they are small fish in highly susceptible environments. Austin is special because of their size, health and numbers. It also doesn’t hurt that they live at the base of on of very few bottom release dams from a very deep lake. Rainbows, and most other fish would thrive if more of our dams weren’t warm water release dams. That is something the west realized only after we screwed it up. Think of the top 10 fisheries in New England and you will find a bottom release dam at the majority.
  25. TightLinesMaine

    Been thinking, which isnt always good

    @LaBonte207, That's fair i guess. Those kennebec/austin stream rainbows are very special for sure, not going to argue that. I do know the ones in the kenny typically get significantly bigger than their wild rainbow counterparts in the androscoggin for whatever reason (water temperature being a big factor probably amongst other variables). I've fished an andro trib (not the wild) this year that isn't stocked with rainbow trout and i caught 4 wild rainbows. Average size was about 5" to 8" for me, but one i caught was a healthy 11" or so. There's several tribs (about a half dozen at least) just on the Maine side of the Andro alone that the IFW has documented wild rainbow trout in the past two decades. Don't take my word though, look up the recent upper androscoggin management plan/report on the Maine DIFW website. I've heard and read that the Andro fishery for rainbows isn't quite what it used to be however, even just 10 years ago... but that's a different topic.
  26. plecain

    Been thinking, which isnt always good

    Got it. Thanks.
  27. LaBonte207

    Been thinking, which isnt always good

    At least 10 years in my personal experience as well. My point is that, IFW makes the call of what wild rainbow populations are protected and, as outlined in their management plan for rainbows, they wish to protect them and work on finding out the ins and outs of these wild rainbow populations. However, there is a lack of empirical data out there suggesting which streams should be protected and which shouldn't. Austin Stream has an abundance of data, showing that it is a productive and utilized stream by rainbows. There isn't that kind of data for for say streams off of the wild river, which is why they aren't protected like Austin Stream. I'm in no way shape or form suggesting there aren't wild populations that exist in the upper Androscoggin, elsewhere on the kennebec, etc. But IFW can't back their decision to protect these areas (like they are with austin stream) because there just isn't enough data to support a change in management. Hope this clears it up.
  28. plecain

    Been thinking, which isnt always good

    I don't understand what you're saying. The rainbows are there. They've been there for at least 10-12 years in my personal experience. There's no stocking going on in these streams or in anything upstream. Downstream, yes, e.g. the Androscoggin. I don't doubt that some time ago these current rainbows are descended from fish stocked in the rivers into which they flow. But, that's true just about everywhere, isn't it?
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