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alas

Cabelas LSi 11' 7WT

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Anyone using one? Just got it on sale. Hoping it will make it easier for me when I'm on salmon river next year. Need to match it with a line, something universal... Chucking nymph set-ups, indicators etc...

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Alas

Welcome to the wonderful world of Spey. Check out the RIO Spey line specifications chart. Your rod is listed. Do your self a favor and take a class if you have never Spey cast. There is nothing harder to do than break bad habits.

Your question on what to use for different set-ups, something universal makes me smile. I have a whole tote bag full of lines to prove that fact. There are different types of casts and lines for different applications.

I am probably not the one you want to take advice from. Maybe some others who have been doing this longer than me will offer some suggestions.

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I have a 10'6" 5wt lsi and a cabelas 11' 8wt tlr. I really think cabelas has some really good budget priced two handers. They are not as refined as some of the high end rods I have raked the water with, but I only use my tlr for the salmon and refuse to invest gobs of money into a rod I rarely use. I throw a rio skagit short with running line on my 5 wt and a rio switch chucker on my 8 wt. I really wish I had a chucker on my 5 wt because I would use it nymphing some rivers in the winter if I did. With the running line it is just a streamer rod since you can't mend well with it. However, the chucker line can do it all. It has and integrated floating running line with a mending/handling section behind the head. It can be used with mow sink/floating tips and swings flies, and nymph with and without indicators very well. It also has a short head so you can fish high water when your back is to the bushes really well. Hope that helps alas.

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Alan, any of your advices are welcome. It always seems that you have something useful and smart to say.

Salmonslayer, that is exactly what I wanted to hear/read. I got this rod because it was so cheap and had some great reviews so I thought it was perfect to get me into world of two-handlers. I don't think I'll need anything better for couple of yearly trips to salmon river and I guess I'll have to try it on the ocean and see how that goes. So, in your opinion rio switch chucker is way to go. The way you described it seems like a perfect line for salmon river. Well, that's what I'm gonna get :). How about overloading? Did you overload your TLR or just matched it?

Thanks for the advice guys, you're huge help!

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On the rio site they give the specs for the chucker line. A #7 is I think 465 grains and would not need to be overlined as if you where using a line designed for a single hand rod. I use the #8 which is 520 grains on my 8wt and I feel like it loads the rod well. Oh and I did try some overhead casting with it in the surf. I just used my 350 grain rio striper line to play around with. It was fun and I could cast further than a single hand rod, but from what I'm told I need a rio outbound short to really bomb the overhead casts out in the surf.

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On the rio site they give the specs for the chucker line. A #7 is I think 465 grains and would not need to be overlined as if you where using a line designed for a single hand rod. I use the #8 which is 520 grains on my 8wt and I feel like it loads the rod well. Oh and I did try some overhead casting with it in the surf. I just used my 350 grain rio striper line to play around with. It was fun and I could cast further than a single hand rod, but from what I'm told I need a rio outbound short to really bomb the overhead casts out in the surf.

Thanks man! Great tips for the surf. What about sinking line, and have you casted it on flats?

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Ya I have cast it on some flats. The striper line I used for overhead casting was a fast sink. Basically strip in, roll cast, pick up, then shoot as much as you can. It wasn't the most efficient or easy line, but it worked. I think I may get a rio outbound for summer though. If you get the chucker line, get some mow tips in varying sink rates and make sure to get a floating tip. The float tip works well when nymphing.

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A little update. I just took out my LSI to salt today and I have to say it was a successful outing. I put on it Rio Striper 26 sink tip 400 gr line and within minutes was able to cast out whole line, all the way to backing. What a difference from a one hander! Certainly less work. It did seem very soft and bendy compared to stiff one-handers that im used to...

I did made a mess once I got into feeding frenzy with a wrong fly... All systems failed... Worked it too fast and got outfiehed badly by Gary :)! However, I switched my fly, slowed down my casting and got into the groove again and even caught a fish just before I had to leave. In a couple of outings as I get more used to it (and buy few more lines for it ) this will become one deadly set-up!

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