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y'sguy

Anyone want to see where lots of big bass are getting taken

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Google Viking Fleet Montauk

and click on the fishing reports 

and get sick.

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Things like that ALWAYS bum me out. People fish for the wrong reasons these days. Most people don't even know how to handle a fish properly. It really is sad across the board. Not only that, what can even be done about it? I feel that anytime I even want to step in and inform an angler of their mistakes, I assume that an ego is just going to get in the way. I can't say that I hold the highest hopes for things, both salt and freshwater...but feel free to tell me if anyone does have ideas of how to combat these sorts of things.

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The reason fishing started was for food, not fun. If these guys are within the law don't disparage them. That's a big part of the gulf between catch your limit anglers and strict (or mostly strict) c&r anglers. 

If we bridged that gap, and not look down on, or be sickened by people keeping fish within the law's limits, I think more would get done in a regulations sense.

Until then, NOTHING will get done.

 

 

 

 

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I do certainly agree in some cases there. While I understand that fishing was initially started for food, I like to think that you're referring to a time where food wasn't nearly as readily available as it is now. And my thing with that is, do you really need to be keeping everything that you catch whenever there are other means of food that are already being produced? Especially when, most of those food sources are already taxing enough on our environment.  And, how often do people really abide by the slot limit rule? I don't know that answer, but I wouldn't be shocked if it were less often than we think; I also haven't seen one person of fishing authority at all to enforce those regulations, but I did see one striper that was gutted that was definitely not 28" during a low tide. 

I'm down for the guys who occasionally keep a fish, it makes sense. I don't do it myself simply because I don't want to deal with the hassle of cleaning, carrying, and letting the fish sit in my freezer for an unexpected time. My qualms with the fellow angler these days lie more with the people who just don't respect our waters and its inhabitants. The guy who has forty-five treble hooks that are littered with barbs, that when the do catch a fish, it wiggles on the deck of their boat for ten minutes and then gets passed around for a picture with everyone present. Then, there's the whole "if it swims away, it has to be alive" thing. I'd assume if I ripped any person out of their home, took pictures of them in a very foreign place by foreign objects, that I'd run like hell as soon as I was let go as well. Fish can die after their caught for sure. 

I can't say anything about the current state of any fishery, but it seems to me that those who respect the fish and do what they can to conserve things are getting fewer and farther between.

That's just my two cents, but I still probably owe a lot more than that. 

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Striped bass cannot withstand the pressure of killing so many fish especially the big breeding ones.  There was a time when there were  many 50-60 lb stripers to spawn . I believe genetically the bigger fish will produce young that will grow bigger .  A 50 lb striper is now rare. The same thing with cod . There is no such  thing as a 50 lb cod anymore . You will hear people say " it's loaded with cod out there "  no it's not and most of what's there is 5-6 lbs.  They regulated them 20 years to late .

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I just can't assume that these people don't care about the fisheries...I fish therefore I risk killing fish every hookup. I feel as though I care.

I use oversized gear in order to not fight fish too long, but I would guess once a fish is played, decent chance it could die. Maybe 10-25%? 

Point is...if you're fishing, you're out for blood, intentionally or not. I try not to pass judgement. 

 

 

 

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You are a lot kinder than me , I do pass judgment and resent the intentional killing . I want stripers to be only catch and release . 

I know it will never happen . 

When General Electric polluted the Hudson River with PCB's and stripers were deemed not fit to eat it brought them back to give us the great fishing we had in the 90's and a few years following . At that point every charter boat became a place to kill stripers . These guys should go get jobs at Burger King or Walmart along with the purse seiners in North Carolina that kill kill kill. 

I wish stripers tasted like **** ! 

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If you fished the cape cod canal at all this year they you'd see first hand the mentality of allot of anglers. I fished it for three consecutive days this year and was disgusted by the amount of big breading fish kept. The Mass environmental police did pretty well on getting the guys who ran to their truck to stash their thirty pounders so they could go back and get more..... Oh the humanity....

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Fishing Violations? Cite Captains and Crew

 
By Editorial | September 28, 2017 - 10:54am

Two recent high-profile incidents involving Montauk party-fishing boats have drawn attention to a problem on the water in which paying customers take too many or too small fish, while the crews, captains, and vessel owners evade responsibility. 

The first of the busts happened aboard the Fin Chaser at the end of August at Star Island in Montauk Harbor. State Department of Environmental Conservation officers approached as the boat reached the dock, and customers were seen dumping hundreds of fish overboard despite orders to stop, then shuffling to their cars empty-handed. 

As the officers investigated, they discovered abandoned coolers, holding what they said were around 1,000 illegally caught black sea bass, porgies, and fluke. Seven anglers were cited for varying offenses, but the captain was issued only a violation ticket — for an incomplete trip report. 

D.E.C. officers were back at it again on Sept. 16, rounding up what they said were 1,800 undersized or over-the-limit fish from patrons on the Viking Starship. Twenty-three anglers received citations dockside in Montauk, but the captain was cited only for an unsecured sanitation device. The fish that could be salvaged went to charity.

There is an irony here. Captains boast of their ultimate authority while at sea. Yet when enforcement officers show up, these self-same Ahabs are able to hide behind a law that absolves them of blame if their clients happen to violate catch limits. This makes no sense. Something has to change. 

It also is interesting to note that the state appears to be finally paying attention to how recreational fishing affects fish stocks. For decades the majority of its enforcement efforts was directed toward commercial harvesters, despite statistics that, in many cases if not all, indicated that sportfishing had an equal or greater impact on the resource.

Party-boat operators insist that they make a good-faith effort to tell their customers about the regulations. This can nevertheless be read as an indictment of party-boat practices in general. It is frustrating for private anglers who scrupulously measure each fish they land and stick to the number allowed per day to find out that party-boat customers openly ignore the same regulations with a wink and a nod from those in charge.

If it is impossible to assure that anglers aboard party boats follow the rules, the next step would be to consider shutting down the industry. A logical and fairer approach is to change state law to make captains, crews, and boat owners legally responsible, through costly penalties, for what their customers do. 

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I was definitely aware that these boats weren't always "playing by the rules," but I wasn't aware that they weren't held accountable for what their customers do illegally. That's just plain silly. If I let a passenger in my car drink a beer, I'm pretty sure I'd get an open container, not the passenger. The same logic should apply; if the boat captain isn't capable of taking responsibility, then what business does he have being a captain? 

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A few impounded boats would concentrate the other captain's attention wonderfully.

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I went into a market yesterday in N.Y. and there in the fish cooler display was the two fillets of a striper that (was) about 20 lbs. 

 Very well Could have been one that one of us carefully fought then released . Now someone is going to have it for dinner. 

It really does make me feel hatred for the guy that caught it and sold it for a few dollars he really didn't need . 

 These shits say ( it helps pay for the gas)  pay for your gas like other guys do and then drop dead along with the other ocean rapists . 

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I also preform catch and release and yeah what was said here is pretty bad but I do not care if some one takes a legal fish home and eats it. If I ate fish I would once in a blue moon. I shoot deer every year and eat them they taste great. But keeping over the limit or not legal size etc. that’s what pisses me off. Christ I could catch a fish and have some next to me catch the same fish I just did and keep it and I wouldn’t care as long as it was legal. It’s there right period. If it sickens you so much don’t fish for them because catch and release kills too

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Prime breeders should not be legal catch. Our current regulations are garbage. Even though I find plenty of great fishing every year I have to bust a** for it, the fishery could definitely use a big boost. I'm one of very few no kill guides, so I'm putting my money where my mouth is. Until we stop intentionally killing breeders the long term state of the fishery is as good as rolling the dice.

Those charter Captains need to be held directly responsible for any illegal catches on their vessels. 

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51 minutes ago, James Browne said:

Prime breeders should not be legal catch. Our current regulations are garbage. Even though I find plenty of great fishing every year I have to bust a** for it, the fishery could definitely use a big boost. I'm one of very few no kill guides, so I'm putting my money where my mouth is. Until we stop intentionally killing breeders the long term state of the fishery is as good as rolling the dice.

Those charter Captains need to be held directly responsible for any illegal catches on their vessels. 

100%  James .  This is about abuse and overfishing .  A guy taking a fish to eat will not destroy the fishery but what is happening now will.  I would love to see all the striper fillets wrapped in wax paper in freezers all freezer burnt that will go in the garbage because it's their right to kill stripers.  It's my right and my kids and grandkids right to a great fishery that is not being destroyed . Sure even those of us that do everything in our power not to injure a fish it does happen but I have no intention of not fishing . 

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I'll agree with the few statements above me for sure. Another thing that's really been irking me is the excess of lobster traps and buoys on nearly every beach. Sure, lobster traps aren't a striper's sworn enemy, but I can't imagine they help things. I've even seen traps with lobsters in them that were washed ashore. Is there any accountability in that? Or, are lobster fisherman just allowed to let their "five" traps do anything it likes? Is it legal to take those traps? Or is that some random law?

 

Not to derail the origin of this post, I think that there are a ton of problems that negatively affect a lot of our fisheries.

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Once they wash up they stay there to very slowly rot . That's why the wooden ones were better .

there are big tangled piles of them offshore .

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On 11/11/2017 at 2:59 PM, Ftyer said:

I'll agree with the few statements above me for sure. Another thing that's really been irking me is the excess of lobster traps and buoys on nearly every beach. Sure, lobster traps aren't a striper's sworn enemy, but I can't imagine they help things. I've even seen traps with lobsters in them that were washed ashore. Is there any accountability in that? Or, are lobster fisherman just allowed to let their "five" traps do anything it likes? Is it legal to take those traps? Or is that some random law?

 

Not to derail the origin of this post, I think that there are a ton of problems that negatively affect a lot of our fisheries.

Lobster traps get washed into shore, it's gonna happen. The commercial guys make a tough living, and have plenty of cash invested in their gear. They do go around collecting traps that are salvageable from time to time. The recreational 5 pot guys you mentioned are probably responsible for a lot of the traps on the beach. I know many of them also do stupid crap like leave their pots soaking so long half of their catch ends up dead. When I find bits and pieces of traps I usually pick them up and throw em away. If it looks like the trap is useful I pull it up onto a rock so it can be seen easily. 

Its a common practice to try and put most of the blame on commercial fisherman, and while some of them do suck most aren't that bad. And when it comes to stripers, recreational anglers account for far more of the harvest and abuse. The damage done to sea life by abandoned lobster pots pales in comparison to the damage done by plastic bags, plastic bottles, balloons etc. Basically everyday plastic garbage that people of all types seem to not give a F about and most of it ends up in the ocean. 

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That all sounds spot on, James, and I appreciate your response. I've been finding quite a few traps and buoys lately, and I sort of viewed it as just making all fisherman look bad to the general public, but I guess it's probably a stretch to even assume the general public cares about trash on their beach. It does make sense that the commercial guys are generally more responsible since it's their living. I just sort of refuse to eat seafood at all, so I'm probably more of a stickler than your average person when it comes to these things, unfortunately. 

And on the other hand, the amount of bottles and other random pieces of "trash" definitely outnumber the traps and buoys. My rule with that sort of trash so far has been, as I find it, throw it away from any potential tides and then retrace my steps on the way back and pick it all up and toss it in my stripping basket; I've yet to have someone beat me to the punch to get that trash picked up, but such is life. Pretty simple process, and with Maine giving you five cents per can, it's almost like getting paid to clean up someone else's mess haha! 

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On 10/22/2017 at 10:43 AM, Ftyer said:

 I also haven't seen one person of fishing authority at all to enforce those regulations, but I did see one striper that was gutted that was definitely not 28" during a low tide. 

 

Ftyer - I hear you.  There are very limited resources with enforcement and a lot of anglers.  I would say if you see something wrong, depending upon your level of comfort, address it with the involved party and/or report it to authorities.  Though not an excuse, some may not realize a rule change - I spoke with one who thought the 20-26" slot was still valid and an adjustment was made. 

I can also confidently state the authorities welcome these calls and are responsive after first hand experience.  After witnessing successive nights of short fish being poached and limits exceeded, I kindly advised the offending parties.  They chose not to listen and were ultimately held accountable.  Not how I would have preferred it to happen but I've also fished some very lean years and what these guys were doing had a direct impact on it.  The better information the authorities have, the better they are able to focus available personnel and make an impact. 

We all have a role to play in the success of the resource, positively or negatively.  I think most of us proceed responsibly though the large operations can have an impact. 

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This may not make some happy but I would support a licesence or striper stamp that if guaranteed that 100% of the money went into enforcement . And a tag like with Atlantic salmon that must be attached to a kept fish. Also with that a quota like they have with tuna . Some of you guys probally don't remember the years when there were no stripers , without regulations  and conservation we will be there  again . 

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18 hours ago, y'sguy said:

This may not make some happy but I would support a licesence or striper stamp that if guaranteed that 100% of the money went into enforcement . And a tag like with Atlantic salmon that must be attached to a kept fish. Also with that a quota like they have with tuna . Some of you guys probally don't remember the years when there were no stripers , without regulations  and conservation we will be there  again . 

I'd be with you, y's.  The only thing I'd want in return, and I would assume anyone else spending hard-earned money, is a well-managed fishery which is easier said than done with thousands of miles of ocean and millions of dollars at play. 

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Said the same thing years ago Billy. nobody ever listens though.

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On 11/15/2017 at 6:49 PM, y'sguy said:

This may not make some happy but I would support a licesence or striper stamp that if guaranteed that 100% of the money went into enforcement . And a tag like with Atlantic salmon that must be attached to a kept fish. Also with that a quota like they have with tuna . Some of you guys probally don't remember the years when there were no stripers , without regulations  and conservation we will be there  again . 

I've been saying the same thing for years, spot on!  It doesn't even have to be that expensive, but it makes enforcement so much easier and effective for the two DMR officers policing our zone.  That's right, two. So if you ever wonder why it's tough for them to get all the poachers just consider that often there is only one officer on patrol for a huge zone. This includes everything from head of tide to 3 miles out, commercial and recreational. 

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