Jump to content
Maine Fly Fish
Sign in to follow this  
squish

SGS Shooting heads

Recommended Posts

Steve Godshall (custom line builder) is now building intermediate, and full sinking type 3 and type 6 lines (scandi and skagit).

If you don't know about Steve and his custom lines (SGS), he is worth a serious look.

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, squish said:

Steve Godshall (custom line builder) is now building intermediate, and full sinking type 3 and type 6 lines (scandi and skagit).

If you don't know about Steve and his custom lines (SGS), he is worth a serious look.

 

 

 

 

I have heard of him and will take a look.  Thanks for the information!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Alan,

I have used his zink tip material to make full sinking, tapered heads.  Very easy to weld together. Much easier than T material.  15 to 23 grains per foot @ 35 cents a foot.

You can find the lines on Bob Meiser's site, but you can call Steve directly and he will make a custom line for you.  He is very easy to deal with and fast.  He loves the idea of what we are doing with TH rods in the salt.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have one of his Scandis - he matched it perfectly to a blank I customized (bastardized).  Cost me no more than an off the shelf option.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Squish

Thanks for the information .  That is a very interesting choice of material. I just may give him a call.   You never have enough lines!:D

Aldo

Thanks for the vote of confidence in his lines.  This is the way to spread the word and hopefully will help someone else.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Alan,

I remember you were using a straight shot of T material for a full sinking head.  With Steve's zink material it's very easy (and inexpensive) to build a full tapered head that casts like a dream.  A cheap hair straightening iron and some shrink tubing is all you need to weld sections and loops together.  You can readily build sinking tips too if/when you need them.

Since I've started using a full sinking line in the salt, I''m finding it hard to use anything else.

So my dilemma......try one of his new sinking heads for 60 bucks, or just keep making my own for under 15?

 I did beat up two heads I made last season and my thinking is that the line for 60 would be much more durable.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Squish

You are correct about me using the T Line.  I use it in conjunction with a floating running line since occasionally I change the tip out for a Skagit or Scandi head.  The T material is so dense it is on the bottom pretty quick. 

I would definitely buy Steve"s tapered heads and you can give us all an update on how they perform.  Though price is important, how they perform is important.   I am always in the market for something new that works better.  

The only issue with the RIO heads that I use is to occasionally make a new looped end as they wear.  I have some that are three years old but at some point they will start to crack along their length and need to be replaced. 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Alan,

I know what you mean about the Rio lines.  I've had the same experience so I've pretty much given up on Rio.

Of the "big three" (Rio, Airflo, SA), the Scientific Anglers seem to be the most durable, at least in my experience, but they keep changing the skagit heads every other year or so and I'm not sure why.

I too like trying new lines out.  The Airflo FIST seemed promising and it does skagit cast really well, but a total bust for overhead casting.  

Steve built an intermediate scandi line for me and it casts like a dream! (I have a floater too).  The only bummer with scandi lines is that they just don't perform well with big flies and in heavy winds.  I do, however, use it a lot on the Cape (Brewster Flats, Morris).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Squish

I was a Scientific Anglers fan for many years. The durability factor was very important at that point in my life with finances being a little short with a growing family.   For one reason or another I gravitated to other manufacturers, I suppose due to the hype.  Everyone is looking for the newest and greatest lines and are in hopes that spending the additional money will lead to that perfect line.  

Rio was my next choice and at first loved the slickness and limited coiling of the lines.  The company started offering so many different line types supposedly line specific to a certain species of fish.  It wasn't until I had expended large sums of money that the realization was that I fish in Maine and nowhere else.  A bonefish line really didn't have much correlation to fishing for Bluefish and Striped Bass.  They  seemed pretty content with any line attached to the fly I was using.

My next step was to the integrated sinking heads offered by AIRFLO.  The concept was good but the welded area between the shooting head and level running line kept breaking.  Due to stubbornness and the assurances of others that the problem had been fixed I bought another.  It lasted perhaps a month longer.

I went back to the RIO lines perhaps for the large assortment and thought that somewhere in the myriad of lines was one that worked well.  I did find lines that worked well and stayed with them for not only the salt but freshwater too.  

At some point in my life I had moved to the two handed rod.  I started picking lines up out of the bargain bins made by AIRFLO but was still using RIO lines too.  The more I used the AIRFLO lines the more apparent that these lines had really improved.  The hinging and breaking of lines was almost non existent on the new integrated lines.  The welded loops on the shooting heads ceased to be a problem as well. AIRFLO was on to something!  At present  I use this manufacturers lines almost exclusively, with a few exceptions of some RIO lines that I already own. 

There are so many new line manufacturers out there now.  Friends that use them are urging me to give them a try. This may come as a surprise to any of you reading this but I will.  After all I am still looking for that perfect line.:)

 

Almost forgot.

 I agree that Scandi lines are still my first choice just because of the elegance of the casts. Even though larger flies are a problem casting in the wind my solution is to tie smaller representations of the common larger flies.  They work!

Thanks for your interest in the topic and Steves lines are next on my list.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Alan,

Just curious, which Airflo heads have you used?

The SA heads were appealing because they offered a full intermediate line.  The others offer intermediate but with a floating section which defeats the purpose (at least for how I fish in the salt).

For fresh water I use Wulff Ambush. 

I am always grabbing used and bargain bin lines because you never know!

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Squish

I use both AIRFLO Compact Skagit and Scandi Heads (Floating.)  

I haven't used the Wulff Lines yet. Those who have used them really like them.  Another line to add to the list.   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, bobbrown said:

Alan....out of interest....what head do you find best for strippers in the salt. 3-4”flies, overhead.

If you are casting unweighted or lightly weighted flies the Scandi works well for me.  It also depends where in the water column you are fishing.  I guess it would all depend on the depth of the water and where the fish are feeding.

 Skagit heads are the norm for a reason. They are much easier to cast and more suited to casting larger weighted flies. ( Scandi heads are just a preference of mine.)  If you are new to using these type rods then choose a Skagit head.

My previous post had become a one on one exchange and I do not want to give the impression that the Scandi head is something anyone should choose.  Two handed casting is like regular fly fishing. The longer we do it the more our personal preferences take over.   This kind of casting is no different.

The Two Handed forum has been so quiet lately that the exchange was kind of refreshing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The reason I ask is a reference to the rio line selector app. Put my info in and it came back the preferred line was skagit max. In the past I have always used a OBS integrated line. I can certainly see the advantage of multiple heads for the skagit system but was concerned how they overhead cast. Do you experience any problems with using them off the beach.  Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you are doing strictly an overhead cast off the beach and are not fishing the bottom then go with the outbound lines.  If you are ever considering doing a spey cast other than the salt then my recommendation is the Skagit Max.  Scandinavian as a last choice if you expect to fish that exclusively in fresh.  I just prefer Spey casting the Scandi Head even in the salt and using lightly weighted Clouser patterns like the Guitar minnow.  I occasionally fish baitfish patterns like Peanut Bunker and smaller patterns like those by Bob Popovic.  

The more you cast these rods you will gravitate toward a particular shooting head or integrated line and that is fine.  The best advice I can give is to try all forms of casting with the two hand rod and then decide.  

I am going to PM you with some additional information that would probably bore everyone else here on the forum.    

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use skagit heads from the beach 100% of the time (overhead), with the biggest flies I can get my hands on and in heavy winds too. Those who will try to talk you out of it probably have never actually done it, or gave up too soon.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, squish said:

I use skagit heads from the beach 100% of the time (overhead), with the biggest flies I can get my hands on and in heavy winds too. Those who will try to talk you out of it probably have never actually done it, or gave up too soon.  

That is true.  Skagit lines are what I started with and will chuck just about anything you want of any weight and size. All of my fishing is bottom fishing with weighted flies, hence that is why I use a T line with a running line.

 If I were fishing Grocery Pollock flies, Articulated or just plain large flies up in the water column then Skagit is the way to go.  With my form of fishing my aim is to keep that sucker on the bottom all the way in so that if there is a strong current it isn't being lifted off the bottom.  I'm lazy and don't want to be picking up 30 feet out for another cast.  I fish it right to the rod tip. The T line because of its smaller diameter than the Skagit head allows you to do that.

Maybe I didn't read the initial inquiry correctly and was reading too much into the question.  

Go Skagit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Alan.....so your running t line directly off your shooting line?  

If your using .... say t 8.....30 feet would be 240 grains.   T 14then would be 420.

both figures well below the grain weights for most rods. 

How does this work?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

bobbrown

I'm using 30 feet of T17 which is 510 grains the perfect casting weight for my 7wt Sage 13' 3"VXP.   Coincidently it is the perfect weight for Spey casting a Scandi Compact which is also 510 Grain.    

The only reason I use the Scandi rather than a Skagit head is I just like the way they cast.  This is only my preference.  As I stated previously Skagit is what I started with and they will definitely cast large heavily weighted flies. ( I guess I'm getting old and like the look of the loop that forms with the Scandi Head.)

Start with the Skagit Head as Squish stated.   When you get experienced with Spey casting verses just the overhead cast you will decide what works for you.  When I stated fishing the salt with the two handed it was strictly overhead casting.   Get some help on the proper way of making overhead casts so that you are not buying additional rods due to improper casting techniques.  Look at the recommended grain weights for your rod and you decide.

If you have any other questions you can give me a call on my cell .  Check your PM.

Alan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Alan....got you number...but due to slow posting during winter I thought it might be more interesting to post on the form. So, I’ll keep asking the questions so all of us can stay involved...thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Squish was this the type of line u had at the meet up last year can’t remember what is was newbie day maine or Alan and Williams thing? Also trying to remember what your reel was I remember it was made off shore just can’t remember maker

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/28/2018 at 7:05 AM, theflyguy said:

Squish was this the type of line u had at the meet up last year can’t remember what is was newbie day maine or Alan and Williams thing? Also trying to remember what your reel was I remember it was made off shore just can’t remember maker

I use the older SA Extreme skagit heads, though at Newbie Day I could have been using a full sinking head I welded together using Steve's Zink tip material.  Great stuff at 35 cents a foot...15 to 23 grains, and welds together like butter. I was considering his new full sink Skagit but the head I put together worked really well so I might pass on it for now.  Also 60 bucks vs.13 bucks........

The reel is a Danielsson Control.  Much more reel than I would ever need for stripers/blues but really feels good.  Might have been nice for those GT's you were after!

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×