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Kevin McKay

Interesting story

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Typical. ****in' posers using social media to turn a natural resource into a commercial endeavor. I'm shocked ! NOT !!!

What do you expect when for years now social media has become just another whorin' ground for the anything for a buck club. 

Keep on buying them $1000.00 smart phones and showing everyone what you catch and where you caught it. Numb bastids ! :angry:

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More than one. I ain't lookin' to make money off it though.

I used to never post fish photos. Then peer pressure from this site got me to start posting them. Damned if I do, damned if I don't.  

Personally I don't give a ****.

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Great read. I'm sure writing that story will get the author on the bad side of many guides and fishermen friendly with the subject. Really called someone out.

I call the phenomenon needing a digital pat on the back.

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Wow, talk about calling someone out! There is a huge difference between posting photos to share your experiences and illegally posting photos for money and fame, particularly when they are spawning fish.

No photos posted on here are going to get you famous or sponsored. None of us, I hope, would fish for trout on redds either.... 

It's a great article and took some balls to post that, but maybe it will prevent future disasters as this one... How would anyone know they are doing something wrong if nobody tells them? 

Thanks for the share. 

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1 hour ago, Jack McDonald said:

Isn't there a photo of you "Mainiac" holding a striper for social media?   Under Saltwater "Ready"

Hey Jack, I think the purpose of the article was missed, and this is absolutely in no way malicious. The article isnt necessarily just about using social media to post pictures, it was more about the lengths that you go to to get that fish and at what cost to the fishery, just to get free stuff and look cool.  Its no doubt that social media has made a huge impact on the fisheries, I personally fished that river that was highlighted in the article in my time in the west, and in just the 5 years that I was there I watched that river get absolutely blown up due to social media, and every time I was there, witnessed groups of people pulling fish off of obvious redds. Showing pictures of a catch that you are proud of has been around since the ability to take pictures, the problem is when people push the ethical boundaries just to get likes.  I see no problem with posting pictures of fish that were caught ethically and legally, especially when its a striper that was tricked to eat a fly, long after it has spawned and revived, in that fish's domain, on his terms.  When it gets to the point where you purposefully target a vulnerable fish with an exponentially increased risk of dying after, in a clearly marked illegal area, that will eat almost anything you put in front on it, at the risk of destroying a fishery, just for free gear and likes, you are losing sight of what this sport is really all about. 

This has been a well known, growing problem in our small world, especially with large companies putting products in peoples hands just for exposure. I used to work for a company that actually took sponsorships away from people who were accused of unethical practices, because we wanted to do all we could to stop the abuse of spawning fish and not give the idea we support these poeple. I know a few guides in Colorado/Wyoming that are pushing for legislation to protect these fish, because the over fishing of spawning fish for the "hero" shot. There needs to be more repercussions for these actions.  This article may be very directed at the said fisherman, but it highlights a much larger issue. Hopefully this article circulates everywhere and brings more awareness to this issue, or we're going to destroy so many fisheries.

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On top of all this the internet in general is one big spot burn. I don’t  understand why somebody will come explore a waterway, catch a bunch of nice fish, and before they even get home they blog a 10 page  post about the place they went, conditions, lures or flys used, how they were caught ect. What makes people want to tell other people about a place they found that is good fishing? I have 1 pond that I love to fish. last year I fished it 12 times. I recorded everything possible in a journal. I averaged 6 salmon an hour, which averaged 17.2”. Biggest was 26”. decent brookie fishing too. previously you could google “fishing on blank pond, Maine.” And the only thing that came up was a blog about a couple kayaking it. Now there is a full page on it in “amazing fish-a-metric.” I talked to some people ice fishing it and asked why they decided to fish there. the guy said he saw it on that website. pissed be off. there’s this 1 guy that has himself in pictures on almost every salmon lake in Southern Maine on that website. I hope I don’t meet this guy in my travels cuzz I will surely ruin his day 

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10 hours ago, LaBonte207 said:

 

It's a great article and took some balls to post that, but maybe it will prevent future disasters as this one... How would anyone know they are doing something wrong if nobody tells them? 

it is very possible they don’t even know they are doing anything wrong. I fish with a lot of friends I would consider rookies that have the best intentions, yet I find myself explaining things to them that we all consider common knowledge and courtesy, that they are completely out to lunch about. If even 1 person reads that article and changes their ways, it’s a success 

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Let’s hope that everyone who is holier than thou, and agreed with this guy, also practices what they preach. I say that hammering a sucker spawn, and all other known bad behavior we see, is the same as fishing over redds. 

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All you that hate the internet for spot burning should stop using the internet just saying.....as most pictures you guys post are a spot burn. Most pictures save the info and can be lifted wether location was told or not. You own a map burn as it tells everybody where the rivers and ponds and roads to get to them.  Spot burn rant gets old. Fishing any spawning fish is just ignorant though and I don’t agree with it. I just can’t believe we have to here about spot burning every three posts on this site

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21 minutes ago, theflyguy said:

All you that hate the internet for spot burning should stop using the internet just saying.....as most pictures you guys post are a spot burn. Most pictures save the info and can be lifted wether location was told or not. You own a map burn as it tells everybody where the rivers and ponds and roads to get to them.  Spot burn rant gets old. Fishing any spawning fish is just ignorant though and I don’t agree with it. I just can’t believe we have to here about spot burning every three posts on this site

I’m not trying to make a spot burn rant. I’m not against posting pictures online, and I agree that everything could be considered a spot burn. but there’s a big difference between posting a picture of a fish without giving to many details, compared to telling every person in the world where and how to catch fish, when they put no effort into “discovering” these places themselves. 

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I agree with TGIF that the sucker spawn is not much different from targeting spawning trout.  Ditto for fishing known spring holes that concentrate trout during times of thermal stress.  Self-promotion of guides and "brand ambassadors" is a separate but often related issue.  Fortunately, we don't see too much of that here in Maine, and I hope that doesn't change.

As for me, I am a brand ambassador for David and Kathy Scott's cane rods (#ardeabamboo), Tom Whittles rod's (#stonycreekrods), Kathy Scott's books (#brooktrout-forest), the guy who ties the orange muddlers for Two Rivers Canoe and Tackle in Medway (#thanks-barry-for-bringing-back-the-freighter-canoe), and canoes sold in backyards (#Uncle-Henrys).

Powered by gas station coffee (#awful-but-hot-and-it-has-caffeine) and peanut butter sandwiches (#thanks-dear).

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2 hours ago, theflyguy said:

Most pictures save the info and can be lifted wether location was told or not. You own a map burn as it tells everybody where the rivers and ponds and roads to get to them.  

I've run into a few pictures here that were geo-tagged. I usually PM the poster to warn him that his pictures are giving away more info than he probably wanted.

In one case, with the geo-tags, Google Earth and his photo I was able to see which rock in the river he was standing on.

So, it's a good idea to remove location info before posting photos.

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Great article. Keeping unethical behavior on the water in check is something we should all aspire to do, publicly or privately. Ryan Hudson raised the bar, good for him and us!

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12 hours ago, TGIF said:

I say that hammering a sucker spawn, and all other known bad behavior we see, is the same as fishing over redds. 

 

10 hours ago, Jeff Reardon said:

I agree with TGIF that the sucker spawn is not much different from targeting spawning trout.  Ditto for fishing known spring holes that concentrate trout during times of thermal stress.  

How is matching the hatch the same as fishing over the trout on a redd?! They are actively feeding on eggs of another species, just because it’s effective and predictable you think it’s unethical? Fishing the smelt run, that’s bad too?  So for the places that have them and it’s legal to, you don’t think people should fish for fall or winter rainbows/steelheads with eggs or egg patterns? The fish need to be protected when they are spawning, not when they are just predictable and hungry.

The spring hole thing I would agree with. If it’s just a seep or a trickle into the main water, that provides just a small area of refuge, then leave them alone as they are prob barely hanging on once the water gets warm. But I would say a spring fed trib of a river is just like fishing any spring fed stream or brook during the summer, as long as the water is still cool. 

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Fishing to the same line of trout hunkered down behind spawning suckers results in catching the same fish many times, and over stresses them. Fishing a smelt run and a big hatch is the same thing, and fair play, but different than the sucker spawn. Fish the more we’ll known sucker spots and you’ll see the same fish caught over and over, many fowl hooked and wearing 3 other flies if you can get them in the net. 

To each their own, but stripping streamer across a whole river because smelt around is much different (in my view) from pounding the crap out of the same 10 fish in a 20’ stretch of water for the entire day.  

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Ps- you’ll know when it is happening because there will be a report in around the 2 weekend of May, and someone will have caught 10 big Brookies and post pictures... then you’ll look really close and realize that the same 2 fish is in 6 of the pics. Trust me....

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1 hour ago, TGIF said:

Ps- you’ll know when it is happening because there will be a report in around the 2 weekend of May, and someone will have caught 10 big Brookies and post pictures... then you’ll look really close and realize that the same 2 fish is in 6 of the pics. Trust me....

This I have seen many times. Is there a difference between a smelt run and a sucker run not really as they are both generally spawning the difference I guess would be ones there eating the fish so a bit of a chase and not as easy for them and other they are eat eggs drifting down stream a little more of a lazy feeding schedule. I would classify both as the same but that’s me

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I guess I spoke before I realized that they literally line up that way, and people are repeatedly snagging them more than the fish actually biting.  If it’s literally trout lineing up behind individual spawning suckers vs them hanging around downstream in a congragated area, I can see how that could be a problem if the person doesn’t move on to the next line of fish.

I can see the issue if the fish won’t move much to feed cause there is so much food around, and people try to drift it into their face for them to take it. fishing that low to them will cause more snagging as your drifting right at their body while they are very close together. I’d still say it’s more of an issue of technique, or people just snagging instead of fishing. Change the depth till your above the fish enough to not hit them, and hope the active ones will tilt their heads up to feed.  Same in a populated feeding seam where a school might line up feeding on an abundance of drifting nymphs. The unethical (or illegal)  part would be the person repeatedly snagging instead of fishing, and trying to claim they caught the fish to to keep or to get attention, or as the article points out, getting sponsored or rewarded by companies that don’t know what is going on.

This whole social media and hashtaging circus is a mess, with people doing things just for the pictures and attention. Ignorantly tagging things with trendy phrases like natives and keeping them wet for the view count, while showing a brown trout laying on the bank. When I see a pic or something with a list of tags taking up most of the text on the screen, I get very annoyed that people are tying so hard to get attention. A picture of a fish shouldn’t need to be tagged with things like nature, river, fall foliage, nice weather, wet rocks etc. 

The media spot burning is a another can of worms. 

Sorry, didn’t realize this turned into a long winded rant. 

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Everyone has a opinion great and is it ethical or unethical is not up anyone person but what articles like this gets us thinking and maybe go about how we treat a great resource 

It's not my place to judge anyone but It gets me thinking 

I still love my smart phone;)

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Well my smart phone found this forum and have made some friends from here so I am happy with it... lol I believe a lot of us visits the site via smart phone so they help keep our community going so that’s good too

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I don't equate fishing over trout redds with fishing the sucker spawn.  I look forward each year to fishing the spawn in several areas and its not always a cake walk.  It just happens that the spot you guys are talking about gets hammered probably more than any place I am aware of and I do agree that the ethics line there gets crossed every year.  

As far as the story goes...good for Ryan Hudson to shine a spotlight on a dude willing to break the rules for fame. Because that's what it is...thirst for fame. I  think the fishing pages of social media like Instagram and Youtube are just full of people using the sport as a vehicle for stardom....which is pathetic in my book.

....and just as aside I wish more people realized that young of the year brookies are still in the gravel come April and early May and slogging up and down the gravel beds is doing just as much damage to a wild fishery as keeping every fish you catch.

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12 hours ago, TGIF said:

Fishing to the same line of trout hunkered down behind spawning suckers results in catching the same fish many times, and over stresses them. Fishing a smelt run and a big hatch is the same thing, and fair play, but different than the sucker spawn. Fish the more we’ll known sucker spots and you’ll see the same fish caught over and over, many fowl hooked and wearing 3 other flies if you can get them in the net. 

To each their own, but stripping streamer across a whole river because smelt around is much different (in my view) from pounding the crap out of the same 10 fish in a 20’ stretch of water for the entire day.  

Yes.  The other difference is that the smelts are typically moving and there are schools of them spread out in multiple places.  The suckers tend to be in a handful of highly predictable places at the same time every year, and they are there for the duration.  And once you figure it out, you can either foul hook the trout behind them or literally guide your little nymph into the open mouth of a trout--which amounts to the same thing, though it is technically legal--over and over and over again.  You can wade right through the run the trout and suckers are lying in, and instead of spooking, the trout will just slide back into their spots.  They will take cover behind your legs if you stand there for a minute or two.  (This can make a short rod a huge advantage if you are "fishing" for them.)

If you happen on the sucker spawn at some random spot in the woods and take a fish or two--good for you.  Especially if you get a few, realize it's fish in a barrel to keep doing the same thing in the same spot, and choose to move on to figure out some other spot/technique that will work--or hunt for wildlflowers or look for spring warblers, or pick fiddleheads.

But if you park on the "secret rock" with a lawn chair, a cooler, and two buddies so you can "guard the pool" while you rotate the spot while you take breaks in turn for a leak, a sandwich, or a beer, and between the three of you you stick hooks in 40 or 50 large trout in an afternoon--you're part of the problem.  If you post those pictures on the internet, you are part of the problem and you are inviting the rest of the problem to join you.

 

PS  One issue with smelts--if you are wading where the smelts are spawning, you are killing smelt eggs.  I see this way too often at some of the well-known hot spots.

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The Patrick Dukes need to be used for target practice Somewhere....

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