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Big tides this weekend

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These tides will provide excellent current for catching stripers. Search the beach edges, sandbars and drop-offs with bigger flies. Think Herring and Mackerel.

Also watch your line of retreat when fishing the rise. 11.3 foot tides means there will be two more feet of water than normal, everywhere. Also the water will rise quicker than normal. Be safe .

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Very good tip about paying attention as you said big tides come in fast definitely watch out. Fishing should be good though.

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Probably many of you know the way the tide changes, but it was very interesting to me. Martha learned this when preparing for her Coast Guard captain license. Here it is

Let's start at low water, although the same thing happens after high water. During the 1st hour of the tide changing, the tidal height increases by 1/12th of the total rise toward high tide. So, if the tidal fluctuation between low water and high water is 12', then it would rise 1' in the first hour, then in 2d hour it will change by 2/12th or 2 ft, and 3d hour will it will change by 3/12th or 4 ft, then another 4 ft in the 4th hour, then reducing in the 5th hour to 2/12th or 2 ft, and finally 1/12 more for only 1 ft change in the last hour before low water.

The precautionary note of the above is that the maximum time of tidal fluctuation occurs during the middle of the tide, which is that 3d and 4th hour. During those 2 hours, the tide will make 50% of its fluctuation, so the current speed is at its greatest. 

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Interesting I mean I know tides decent from a experience perspective. I was just talking to a buddy about this same thing and was wondering what the numbers for it are. Thank you that helps

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45 minutes ago, saltyshores said:

Let's start at low water, although the same thing happens after high water. During the 1st hour of the tide changing, the tidal height increases by 1/12th of the total rise toward high tide. So, if the tidal fluctuation between low water and high water is 12', then it would rise 1' in the first hour, then in 2d hour it will change by 2/12th or 2 ft, and 3d hour will it will change by 3/12th or 4 ft, then another 4 ft in the 4th hour, then reducing in the 5th hour to 2/12th or 2 ft, and finally 1/12 more for only 1 ft change in the last hour before low water.

Excellent info and very clearly explained!  I certainly didn't know the specifics on that, but it absolutely makes sense.  How often do we have our very best fishing of the session in the 3rd or 4th hour after scheduled high/low?  Pretty frequently in my time.

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This is trigonmetry as the tide is a sine wave. Lots of useful math for navigation. In your example 3/12ths should be 3 feet but I understand what your saying. 

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6 hours ago, clousah said:

This is trigonmetry as the tide is a sine wave. Lots of useful math for navigation. In your example 3/12ths should be 3 feet but I understand what your saying. 


Thanks, Clousah!

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I had to actually write this down, as apparently, my brain is still asleep this morning. :lol:

In the above example, shouldn't the 3rd and 4th hour both be 3 feet?  Simply basing that on a total change of 12'.

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I've been reading a ton about that current movement progression lately (made a post on it a week or so back). I haven't read it in the "rule of 12ths" though, that makes it way easier to follow. The predictions I've been reading don't have it being as consistent though, where some tides the current takes 2+ hours to start ramping and the max current falling more towards the end of the tide than the middle.

I may understand that wrong, but for the sake of fishing your way is SO much easier to follow!


As for this weekend, big tides, big fish, wife out of town... If anyone wants to meet up one morning I'll be fishing solo all weekend so the camaraderie is welcome :-)

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The salt marshes are super complex when it comes to timing of current with high water being a few hours later up the marsh than down at the mouth... add in a big river and things get really screwy. Where we duck hunt in Merrymeeting Bay the incoming tide takes 7 or so hours and the outgoing only takes 5 and change!

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13 hours ago, R-Factor said:

I had to actually write this down, as apparently, my brain is still asleep this morning. :lol:

In the above example, shouldn't the 3rd and 4th hour both be 3 feet?  Simply basing that on a total change of 12'.

You are correct, R-Factorl rgw 3d abd 4th hours  should be 3 feet each. Seems that too many early fishing mornings interfered with my brain, LOL

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